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    Welcome to Reilly Painting and Contracting, "The Home Mechanics," and Reilly Properties. We are your Cleveland home contractors who specialize in major home design projects and remodels, and minor home repairs. We also provide house rentals throughout Cleveland, Ohio.

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    "The house absolutely glows with a new-found beauty. Tom is a genius in his ability to coordinate the work done to my home. In between many raindrops, he managed to get the painting done in a few days and have Mike, the roofer, and his crew tear off and replace the shingles and wood in two days time. And even though I'm on the west side, Tom was able to catch me before I left for work around 8:00 a.m. Your company has really boosted the resale value of my house. I plan to engage you again for interior work in the coming years. Thank you for a job well done!"

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  • Staying Fit When It Doesn’t Run In The Family

    [caption id="attachment_4860" align="alignleft" width="316" caption="Staying Fit When It Doesn't Run In The Family"]Fitness[/caption]

    The Fat gene is sometimes part of a family. There are just some families who are naturally bigger than others. If you are trying to stay fit with this gene, here are some tips, courtesy of The New York Times Health Section:

    Just in time for Thanksgiving, a major new study offers some hopeful news about fat and fate, as well as about the consequences of the choices we make.

    For the research, investigators tallied the results of dozens of studies about the effects of exercise on the so-called fat gene, which is believed to increase the risk that carriers will be overweight or obese by 12 percent or more. Scientists first identified this gene, called the “fat mass and obesity-associated” gene, or FTO gene, several years ago, and as it turns out, it’s distressingly common. By most estimates, about 65 percent of people of European or African descent and perhaps 44 percent of Asians carry some version of the FTO gene.

    These findings would seem to suggest that most of us are doomed to be tubby, an enervating idea — and one that may even be self-fulfilling. In a study published in February in The New England Journal of Medicine, volunteers who learned that they carried the FTO gene or similar fat-promoting genes frequently turned afterward to heedless binging, consuming more fatty foods in the next 90 days than they had in the preceding months, presumably because they believed that their fate, at least in terms of weight, was sealed.

    But the new report, published this month in the journal PLoS Medicine, emphatically suggests otherwise. It found that physical activity, even in small doses, may subvert genetic destiny.

    “Soon after FTO was discovered in 2007, studies showed that physical activity attenuates” the effect of the gene on body weight gain, said Ruth Loos, a program leader at the Institute of Metabolic Science in Cambridge, England, and senior author of the study. “However, these were followed by studies that could not convincingly confirm this interaction or that did not find an interaction at all.”

    Hoping to reduce the scientific confusion about the role that exercise might play in the gene’s activity, she and her colleagues contacted the studies’ many authors in the United States and Europe and asked them, as a professional courtesy, to reanalyze their data. They suspected that part of the reason for the varying results was that individual research teams had employed widely different methods to quantify and define physical activity levels. So for the most part they defined what constitutes a physically active person as someone who engaged in at least an hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week.

    Read more at The New York Times

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